Managing your Inbox

by | Jul 2, 2019

There was a time when your inbox referred only to “a boxlike tray, basket, or the like, as on a desk, for holding incoming mail, messages, or work.” How efficiently you made your way through this inbox without cluttering up your desk would influence how others viewed your work. An ever increasing tower of unanswered messages and forms in your inbox or scattered across your desk would lead others to question your organization skills and reliability. Today, your inbox is more likely to be found in an Outlook account on a company desktop or laptop computer and yet the habits for managing incoming work continues to impact how others view performance and skills. 

In a recent Business Insider article, Shana Lebowitz and Allana Akhtar report that “[m]anaging your inbox is an underrated workplace virtue, argues Richard Moran, CEO of consultancy Frost & Sullivan. When employees don’t respond, coworkers perceive them as unorganized and lazy.”  This is of course dependant on the job and how intensively it relies on email corespondence. Indeed, Lebowitz and Akhtar go on to acknowlege that “it’s impossible to look at anyone’s inbox and say for sure that he or she is a productivity ninja or a psychopath. Your email management strategy depends heavily on your profession, for example, and the standard flow of email in your office.”  Generally, it remains a good idea to handle incoming messages and work in an orderly and prompt manner, be it with the physical mail you receive or in your work inbox. 

 

Photo: retrieved from Pixabay, available under the public domain.

 

This posting is brought to you by Contemporaries Inc., one of the best temp agencies in Boston MA. Also available for payrolling employees in Boston and Greater Boston

Recent Posts

The Selfless Spirit
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Tumblr
  • LinkedIn
  • Pinterest

The Selfless Spirit

Ambition can be a great motivator but your actual actions should not be based on personal gain in the workplace, rather with a selflessness that moves the team and organization forward. This constructive quality over one's ego is one that distinguishes a responsible...

Quote of the Day: Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Tumblr
  • LinkedIn
  • Pinterest

Quote of the Day: Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.

At work, as in life, growth and change require taking the chance to explore, dream and discover. As observed by H. Jackson Brown Jr. in a line from PS. I Love You that is often misattributed to Mark Twain:   Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by...

The Team Comes First
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Tumblr
  • LinkedIn
  • Pinterest

The Team Comes First

Sayings like 'the customer is always right' or 'first' may be rooted in the positive goal of satisfying the customer, but your team should come first. Dede Henley observes in her Forbes article on inspiring teams that "it’s common sense, isn’t it? Fight for your...

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This

Share this post with your friends!